Walking the Camino-Part Two

El Camino

We had a bit of rain and wind during the first few days of our Camino. Once we dropped down into Roncesvalles, the weather improved. However, I wasn’t able to shake the cold I caught on the first day’s hike in the rain. Luckily, there was a pharmacy in Zubiri and I was able to get some help. The pharmacists in most European cities are very well trained and give great advice. Even in this very small town, the person who helped me spoke English.

Glad to see this place!

After a 13.5 mile walk, we stopped in Larrasoaña for the night. Although our albergo was adequate, I would not recommend spending the night here. There were no stores or real restaurants in town. The one spot to eat had just a few choices and was quite busy. Luckily for us, the friendly owner did a great job handling a crowd and the food was fine.

A few challenges along “the way”.

Camino Resources
On this more popular Camino route, there were many resources to make our walk easier. Sometimes in the middle of nowhere, there was a stand where someone was selling fresh fruit juices and snacks. There were even a few spots where water and snacks were offered for free, with a donation suggested. If you needed a lift, it wasn’t hard to find someone to call you a taxi. There are also several inexpensive ways to have your pack taken to the next stop on your itinerary. There were always advertisements in the hotels and hostels—or check the many online sites such as Caminofácil or Follow the Camino if planning ahead.

The trail to Pamplona

After three full days of walking, my cold wasn’t getting any better, so I decided to get a ride into Pamplona for a bit more resting time. The owner of Pension Mendi was very kind and let me in early so I could catch an extra nap. I only asked to drop my luggage, but she saw right away that I could use some rest. This was typical of the hospitality we received in Northern Spain during our trek.

Crossing Rio Ulzama

Bob walked on his own for that fourth day, but there were always other Peregrinos to walk with for company. And he had plenty of great scenery to enjoy.

Entering Pamplona
Portal de Francia-Gate into Pamplona

We were very pleased we chose to stay two nights in Pamplona, which I will describe in the next post.

About msraaka

I am an artist, writer and desktop publishing consultant living in the Pacific Northwest. After our first visit to Italy, my husband Bob and I have found ways to spend more and more time there and other countries in Europe. We love to travel, but especially to stay in one area and get a better sense of place. I love learning languages, so I continue to study Italian, French and Spanish so I can communicate a bit more with the locals. Even learning the basic greetings can make a big difference.
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4 Responses to Walking the Camino-Part Two

  1. lemonodyssey says:

    A great guide, Martha. Love the sheep photo and the delightful farmhouse painting in part one, and all the great photos of scenery, towns, and hikers (you and Bob)!

  2. Ingrid says:

    Thank you, Marta, for taking us with you on this trip! Love your report as well as your photos.
    Did I get it right you booked all accomodations in advance? I wonder how to decide upfront how far you may come as my guess is it also depends a lot on the weather (heat, rain, …) Or did I get it wrong and you booked it on short notice while your trip?

    • msraaka says:

      We booked ahead of time and we didn’t have to make any changes. But we did use Booking.com so we could make a change (usually 24 hours before) if needed.
      However, we met several people who were making reservations the same day they needed a room. Sometimes they had to walk a bit further.

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